PARTIES DONE BY MILITARY BASED ON ARTICLE OF BURUNDI CRISIS The current crisis has gradually raised questions about the status and advantages acquired by the Burundian army since 2004

PARTIES DONE BY MILITARY BASED ON ARTICLE OF BURUNDI CRISIS
The current crisis has gradually raised questions about the status and advantages acquired by the Burundian army since 2004. Subjected to a massive reduction in manpower at the end of the civil war, the National Defence Force has certainly been pampered by the government but its involvement in peacekeeping missions has been its real lifeline and has turned it into a privileged institution in this poor country. However, the government’s hard-line policies are potentially undermining this stabilising effect.

Making the army the showcase of the peace process allowed the government to develop a self-promoting discourse for its international partners, praise the success of Burundi’s approach to consolidating peace and reduce the UN’s presence in the country, perceived as too intrusive. By becoming the best example of the Arusha Agreement, the army improved its image and status and obtained major advantages as a result. But it was especially its participation in peacekeeping missions that brought new advantages: professionalisation, new financial resources for both the military and the government, posts in international agencies, etc. With its participation in AMISOM starting in 2007, the government discovered a strategy to reduce poverty within the army.

As with previous governments, those who came to power in 2005 were aware of the need to ensure soldiers’ welfare. Army members received a pay increase in 2006, social benefits (mortgages at preferential rates, installation of basic infrastructure at new properties, free health care, etc.) and generous promotions (inflation of the officer corps) all of which played a key role in the success of integration. However, the government’s lack of financial resources made it impossible to avoid social tension within the armed forces (for example, in 2009, on the issue of housing allocations).

From 2007, participation in AMISOM eased the shock of demobilisation/restructuring and reduced social discontent in a poor army. While a new wave of demobilisation was in the offing, the government became involved in Somalia and suspended staff cuts to the armed forces. The Burundian army currently comprises about 25,000 men, including 5,000 (a fifth) deployed in Somalia. This involvement has allowed a substantial increase in wages ($800 per month in Somalia compared to $40 in Burundi). The duration of the mission means that nearly all members of the Burundian army have completed a tour of duty in Somalia (some are even in Somalia for a second time). Moreover, the death in service benefit is $50,000 to the nominated beneficiary. In Gitega, Burundi’s second largest city, AMISOM veterans have built a new residential district.

ARTICLE OF AFRICAN UNION ABOUT HUMAN RIGHTS OF THE PEOPLE OF BURUNDI
AUC Chairperson’s condolence message to Burundi flood victims
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – 12 February 2014
AUC Chairperson’s condolence message to Burundi flood victims
The Chairperson of the African Union Commission, H.E. Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, has learnt with great sadness, of the devastation caused by heavy floods in parts of Burundi’s capital city Bujumbura, following torrential rains this week. The tragic consequences of the floods include over 60 people dead and more than 80 wounded. The floods also destroyed hundreds of houses and thousands of individuals and families have been rendered homeless.

On behalf of the African Union Commission and on her own behalf, the Chairperson conveys her heartfelt condolences and sympathies to the families of the victims, the Government and people of Burundi.

In solidarity with the victims, the AU Head of Mission in Burundi and the Chairperson’s Special Representative to the Great Lakes Region, H.E. Boubacar Diarra is leading a delegation to assess the humanitarian situation in order to provide the much needed assistance from the African Union and the rest of the humanitarian community

LATEST UPDATE OF BURUNDI CONFLICT
Inter-Burundian dialogue aimed at resolving political crisis triggered by President Nkurunziza’s 2015 decision to stand for third term. African Union (AU) Peace and Security Council 2 Oct reaffirmed support for East African Community (EAC) team facilitating talks, said AU would reduce number of human rights observers and military experts in Burundi and called on EU to lift sanctions. Govt supported facilitation team’s proposed agenda, focused exclusively on preparations for 2020 elections, while opposition expressed desire to include other issues including fallout from Nkurunziza’s decision to stand for third term.
Eleven nominally opposition but in reality pro-govt parties on 15 Oct conditioned their participation on strict respect for agenda. Opposition party Sahwanya FRODEBU 19 Oct withdrew from coalition of opposition parties in deportation CNARED. Goverment boycott fifth round of talks on 25 to 29 Oct in Arusha, Tanzania reiterating that it would not take part in dialogue including those accused of plotting 2015 failed coup. EU 25 Oct extended travel bans and asset freezes against four govt officials until 31 Oct 2019 citing lack of progress in resolving stalemate.

National Security Council late Sept suspended foreign NGOs for three months starting on 1 Oct on grounds that they failed to respect Jan 2017 law on foreign NGOs, but gave no details on violations. Goverment on 2 Oct said to be able to resume work NGOs must deposit third of budget in Central Bank, sign agreement with foreign affairs ministry, agree to support national development plan and adhere to ethnic quotas for employees. Three International Rescue Committee staff arrested in Muyinga 10 Oct for violating ban. Unidentified armed group night of 7-8 Oct attacked Murwi commune, killing two, local authorities blamed Rwanda.

LAW INVOLVING IN THE BURUNDI CONFLICT
427355172720″GENEVA” Law
Protects victims of armed conflict
Modern “GENEVA” law mainly based on the four 1949 Geneva Conventions and 1977 Additional Protocol to the Geneva Conventions
“GENEVA” Law
Protects victims of armed conflict
Modern “GENEVA” law mainly based on the four 1949 Geneva Conventions and 1977 Additional Protocol to the Geneva Conventions

9702803101975The Geneva Convention was a series of international diplomatic meetings that produced a number of agreements, in particular the Humanitarian Law of Armed Conflicts, a group of international laws for the humane treatment of wounded or captured military personnel, medical personnel and non-military civilians during war or armed conflicts.

The Geneva Convention was a series of international diplomatic meetings that produced a number of agreements, in particular the Humanitarian Law of Armed Conflicts, a group of international laws for the humane treatment of wounded or captured military personnel, medical personnel and non-military civilians during war or armed conflicts.