INTRODUCTION In today’s increasingly changing world both employers and employees are trying to find ways to make jobs more meaningful and satisfying

INTRODUCTION
In today’s increasingly changing world both employers and employees are trying to find ways to make jobs more meaningful and satisfying. They want interesting, challenging jobs where they feel that they can make a real difference to other people’s lives. One of the ways to do this is to redesign jobs to meet better new requirements.

Hence the key factor in good job design is job enrichment. Job enrichment is an approach to job design. Its focus is to increase the depth of the job by the amount of discretion and responsibility, the job holder has. This is the practice of enhancing individual jobs to make the responsibilities more rewarding and inspiring for the people who do them.

With job enrichment, you expand the task set that someone performs. You provide more stimulating and interesting work that adds variety and challenge to an employee’s daily routine. This increases the depth of the job and allows people to have more control over their work. Examples: We use job enrichment to make work more challenging and rewarding for our employees to make it easier to keep them.

Job Enrichment refers vertical expansion of jobs. It increases the degree to which the worker controls the planning, execution, and evaluation of work. An enriched job organizes the tasks so as to allow the worker to do a complete activity, increases the employee’s freedom and independence, increases job responsibility and provides feedback.

Employee’s job enrichment could be done in number of ways as follows.

By job rotation, allows workers to do different varieties of tasks.

By combining tasks, work activities are combined to give more challenging work assignments.

By implementing participative management, this allows employees to participate in decision making and strategic planning.

By providing autonomy for work , this allows employees to work independently
By providing feedback for their work, this allows employees to understand how poor or well they are doing.

By increasing client relationships, this increases direct relationship between employee and his clients.

 Based on above understanding of job enrichment, we have identified factors which by which job enrichment could be done .These factors are as follows.

Job redesigning
Autonomy
Feedback
Work place challenge
Customer interaction
Participate management
Flexible working hours
Use of technical skills
On the job training
The main objectives of the project is to understand the JOB ENRICHMENT IMPACT ON EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION in detail by interacting with the management, supervision and workers and to see how far the various measures are implemented and bring out the drawbacks if any and recommended measures for the betterment of the system. Secondly to critically evaluate the JOB ENRICHMENT impact on employee motivation as well as on absenteeism and turnover. At last study the most extensive changes those are critical for high motivation and performance.

The job enrichment is a career development program for employees who wish to expand their skills by learning different job duties. Eg’s: cross training to learn new skills and job rotation to perform new tasks in another position. It is the process of improving work processes and environment as they are more satisfying for employees.
The process includes-
Turn employees’ effort into performance.

Link employees’ performance directly to reward.

Make sure that the employee wants the reward.

The term job enrichment has defined as “an attempt to motivate by giving employees the opportunity to use the range of their abilities”— idea developed by
FREDERICKHERZBERGin 1950.

‘Job Enrichment’ is defined as “the addition to a job of tasks that increase the amount of employee control or responsibility. It is a vertical expansion of the job as opposed to the horizontal expansion of a job, which is called job enlargement”.

—F. JOHN REH
IMPORTANCE OF JOB ENRICHMENT:
Job Enrichment is a key to successful motivation and productivity and it is very promising and an effective way to make workers and the total organization more effective.

Enriching jobs is a motivational training program for all employees. It is particularly an effective way to develop employees provided the jobs are truly enriched, not just more work for them to do.
It can be enriched by enhancing individual jobs more responsibility which is inspiring and rewarding. Increased freedom.
Responsibility and feedback yield correct performance.

NEED FOR THE STUDY
Job Enrichment is a mechanism for recording progress and providing feedback to the employee on performance growth. The need of the study of job enrichment comes in terms of assurance of no obsolete jobs as it is live. The study is also a requirement for the development of employees’ career. It is a need for the motivational tool of employee satisfaction. It also includes the need for the removal of misconceptions about the job, as the top management helps to remove differences by mentoring.
SCOPE OF THE STUDY
The term Job Enrichment in its broader sense covers various aspects of the motivational factors that create a sense of satisfaction and enjoyment in the work of employees in the organization. The present study will aim at making people’s job more “Interesting” and “Challenging” at HDFC Bank. The important principles of Job Enrichment were comprehensively discussed. The study is dependent on the opinion expressed by the employees of all the departments of the components division that are working at HDFC Bank.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
The following are the specific objectives behind taking up of the study in this organization.
To study the significance and effectiveness of employee job enrichment in the company.

To study and analyze the factors of job enrichment.
To analyze the prominent tendencies causing job enrichment.

To suggest methods to improve the process of job enrichment for HDFC Bank.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY:
Job Enrichment refers vertical expansion of jobs. It increases the degree to which the worker controls the planning, execution, and evaluation of work. An enriched job organizes the tasks so as to allow the worker to do a complete activity, increases the employee’s freedom and independence, increases job responsibility and provides feedback.

Employee’s job enrichment could be done in number of ways as follows.

By job rotation, allows workers to do different varieties of tasks.

By combining tasks, work activities are combined to give more challenging work assignments.

By implementing participative management, this allows employees to participate in decision making and strategic planning.

By providing autonomy for work , this allows employees to work independently
By providing feedback for their work, this allows employees to understand how poor or well they are doing.

By increasing client relationships, this increases direct relationship between employee and his clients.

The research methodology adopted in this research consists of the following steps:
Procedure followed: Based on above understanding of job enrichment, we have identified factors which by which job enrichment could be done .These factors are as follows.

Job redesigning
Autonomy
Feedback
Work place challenge
Customer interaction
Participate management
Flexible working hours
Use of technical skills
On the job training
A questionnaire was prepared to see the effect of all of the above factors of employee motivation, absenteeism and turnover which in turn effects employee satisfaction.

Independent variables for the study: Job Enrichment ( Job redesigning, Autonomy, Feedback, work place challenge, customer interaction, participative management, flexible working hours, use of technical skills, on the job training)
Dependent variables for the study: Motivation, Absenteeism, Turnover, Job Satisfaction.

Rese17arch methodology, which is followed by researcher, is Descriptive study
SAMPLING PLAN:
Owing to the large number of employees to be introduced to elicit their opinions on the effectiveness of Information present and required both personnel and organization programs and time constraints have forced to opt for the method of sampling instead of consensus.

The process of Convenience Simple Random Sampling is used to select the respondents, to provide for equal probability in the selection of respondents.

SAMPLE SIZE:
The researcher has allowed to do the project in particular division in the organization. The study is limited to only that particular division.

TOTAL SIZE: 200
SAMPLE SIZE: 50
SAMPLE DESIGN:
The usual approach is to draw inferences based on sampling about the parameters of population from which the samples are taken.

This sampling design is determined before any data is collected the researcher adopted simple random sampling techniques for this study, the simple random sampling refers to that sampling in which each every unit of the population as an equal opportunity of being selected in the sample.

RESEARCH DESIGN:
There was a descriptive type research design followed. The techniques for collecting the information were devised from several methods like observation, questionnaires, etc.

DATA SOURCE:
PRIMARY DATA:
Keeping in view of the above objectives of the study, a structured type Questionnaire is prepared with close ended questions and distributed to 50 persons for the sample and collected opinions.

Type of data collected was of Nominal type since it was based on information from employees.

SECONDARY DATA:
This was collected from the text books, magazines, and journals, websites. A sample of 50 employees was taken randomly.

LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
But even the strongest supporters of job enrichment readily admit that three are limitations in its application. They can be analyzed in the following manner-
1.Technology: There are some jobs, which are highly technical requiring skill it would be difficult to enrich such jobs. And with specialized machinery and assembly line techniques it may not be possible to make.

2..Cost: Thought a great many companies appear to be interested in job enrichment programs, the extra cost may seem high if a company is not convinced that the return will at least offset the increase expenditure. General Motors tried six man and three man teams in the assembly line but from that they found the work shoed and cost increased. At Saab & Volvo and motors India. It was found that increase cost is compensated by reduced absenteeism and labour turnover.
3. Attitude of managers: Another problem is the tendency of top managers and personal specialist to apply their own scale people’s personalities. As a result a few companies have abandoned or modified their programs. M.Scott Myers believes that the failures have occurred because the manager were not really committed to theory ‘Y’ and in most cases job enrichment is usually imposed on people.

4. Attitude of Workers: The attitude of some employers also represents obstacles. Various surveys of workers attitudes have shown that high percentages of workers attitude have shown that high percentages of workers are not interesting jobs. Some have complained that enriched jobs provide too many opportunities to commit mistakes. Some workers fears that the increased productivity sought may even mean loss of jobs.
5. Reaction of union Leaders: There has been little or no support of job enrichment by union Leaders. If job enrichment was so important to workers. It must have been translated in to united demand but it has never happened. Instead Leonard woodcock the President of united Automobile Worker has been quoted to have said about job enlargement that “a” lot academic writer are writing a lot of nonsense’.

How to make it Effective:
The limitation of job enrichment applies mainly to jobs requiring low level of skills. The job of highly skilled workers professional and manager already contain varying degrees of challenge and accomplishment. Perhaps these could be enriched considerably more than they are by applying modern management techniques. And all level particularly in non-managerial levels several approaches could be made to job make enrichment appeal to higher-level motivations.
1.The people involved must have a substantial voice in the planning process. It should not be overlooked that people like to be involved, to be involved to be consulted and to be given an opportunity to offer suggestions. They like to be considered as people.
2. There is needed for better understanding of what people want. It has been pointed out by motivation researches that this varies with people and situations generally people with few skill want extrinsic factors such as pay, benefits, job security, and sympathetic supervisor as then one moves up the ladder intrinsic factors do become increasingly important.

3. It should also result in worker enrichment if productivity increases are the main goal of job enrichment, the programmer must show how workers would benefit.
Job enrichment, in short involves redesigning of the immediate job, it also requires an enlargement of sense of respect by those who manage. In our complex personal impersonal bureaucratic organizations, this respect for the individual can be lost all too quickly. But without this respect we can never expect to make full use of our human resources.

To sum up, at the company, Employers often use in their speeches the cliché that “workers are our most important asset” without doing much to improve working conditions and the motivation of employees to do their best for the organization. The Company implement programs that enhance employees’ knowledge, abilities, and experience and allow them to apply these new skills in their work will be profitable in the future.

In today’s fast changing world, with the rising level of education employees aren’t any more satisfied with repetitive, not meaningful, tasks. Job Enrichment offers a good way to increase the variety of work and to motivate employees to truly commit themselves for the benefit of the whole organization.
Hence, the JOB Enrichment consistently improves morale in terms of job satisfaction, organizational climate, satisfaction with supervisors, and other measures. Thus, the result will be a better motivated, more committed work force that will translate directly into increased job satisfaction.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE
Job enrichment certainly is not new; it was first used back in the 1940s at IBM. During the 50’s and 60’s Fredrick Herzberg decided to carefully study and research the key factors affecting a worker’s performance. The main founding of his research was that certain factors seemed to make workers unsatisfied with their work. These factors seemed to directly relate to the employee’s environment such as the physical surroundings, supervisors and even the company itself. Based on these findings Herzberg developed a theory and named it the “Motivation-Hygiene Theory.”
In his theory, he made a distinction between two kinds of factors in relation to the work people do. He distinguished between factors which reduced the dissatisfaction of the people, and those which contributed to positive satisfaction. According to Hertzberg, the problem before an organization may be to reduce dissatisfaction on the one hand, and to provide satisfaction to employees on the other. He used the term ‘hygiene’ for the factors which cause dissatisfaction and ‘motivators’ for those which contribute to the satisfaction of people with their work.
Amongst the hygiene, he listed company policies of administration, supervision, relationship of employees with peers, subordinates, status. Security, etc. Thus these factors may help an organization to reduce the dissatisfaction of people. To provide positive satisfaction to people Hertzberg highlighted the necessity to attend to qualitatively different factors. These factors (motivators) were listed as- the sense of achievement a person has from the job, the recognition he gets for his work, the nature of the work itself, amount of responsibility he has to share in the work, the possibilities of advancement in the job, and opportunities to learn new things and grow in work. According to him, the motivators contribute to the satisfaction of the people in the job and their development while they work in an organization.

Hertzberg theory, also called the two factor theory of motivation, led to a practical Programmer of using a job as a major medium of developing and changing some organizational practices. The practical aspect of intervening in the organization was called job enrichment. Herzberg called this as ‘Vertical loading of the job’ as he used the term to indicate the need of providing more motivators in work. The process of enrichment is the process of providing valuable things to a person. Since an employee job is extended so that he has to do more work, it is called ‘Horizontal loading’.
Thus, according to his theory, for a worker to be happy and therefore productive, these environmental factors must not cause discomfort. Although the elimination of the environmental problems may make a worker productive, it will not necessarily motivate him. The question remains, “How can managers motivate employees?” Many managers believe that motivating employees requires giving rewards. Hertzberg, however, believed that the workers get motivated through feeling responsible for and connected to their work. In this case, the work itself is rewarding. Managers can help the employees connect to their work by giving them more authority over the job, as well as offering direct and individual feedback.

From this theory Hertzberg developed a set of principles in 1968 for the enrichment of jobs which are as follows:
removing some controls while retaining accountability;
Increasing personal accountability for work;
assigning each worker a complete unit of work with a clear start and end point;
granting additional authority and freedom to workers;
making periodic reports directly available to workers rather than to supervisors only;
The introduction of new and more difficult tasks into the job;
Encouraging the development of expertise by assigning individuals to specialized tasks.
Job enrichment entails the improvement on the work processes of human resources and the creation of a good working environment that would foster sense of satisfaction to the workforce, wherein part of job enrichment aims is to eradicate dysfunctional elements that leads to job dissatisfaction among the employees.  In fact, it is making jobs less Tayloristic means adapting job design to these psychological needs, which raises intrinsic motivation and thus leads to increased productivity (Kelly, 1982).  Moreover, according to Streeck (1987) analyzes anti-Taylorism as a strategy to attain flexibility, by extending workers’ status to obtain “extra-functional” contributions from them.  From the function and intentions of job enrichment, is not at all a very hypocritical approach and exploitative management technique to get the most from human resources.  However, when job enrichment is not properly implemented, unhidden bad intentions grew out from it and when there is no thorough study as to what extent this will impact the workforce, it is likely that the results would adversely have an effect on the workforce, and that would pertain to a devastating job enrichment cost.

            The letter to the editor being send by Stone was an illustration of the ineffectiveness of the job enrichment in her work.  In the letter, four issues were identified and each would be tackled one at a time. 
First issue
Is the assumption of the human resource manager that the issue of job enrichment are consented by the employee at their own freewill and without consideration on the plausible underlying factors that may alter the consensus.

The job enrichment technique of ensuring that objectives are being clearly well-defined and understood is not being practiced, thus, contributing to the feeling of no prior consultation and lack of understanding on Stone’s part.

Second issue
Identified was the feeling of disappointment and unfairness on Stone’s part brought about by the job enrichment. 
Stone claimed the inability of managers to show appreciation to the additional efforts being exerted and the lack of encouragement from the management lead to the perception that job enrichment only benefited the company and not the workforce. 
The emergence of conflict of interest between employee and employer with regards the distribution of revenues; employer and employee also have a common interest in maintaining continuity of the production process itself (Kelly, 1982). 
True to the statement, some of the employees even though they feel dissatisfied in their work, the common interest of continuity in the production process is able to sustain the employees and employers.

The human resource department in Stone’s workplace was not able, if able, fail to create a supportive atmosphere for the employees, which in turn lead to the development of mistrust with regards to the true intentions of the job enrichment.   
Third issue
That is taken into account is that the employee feels the company and managers are being inconsiderate in her situation being a mother and had add-up stress on her behalf since the company has given her more work as part of the job enrichment. 
According to Aglietta (1979), job enrichment, leading to the formation of semi-autonomous groups is the mode of organization” corresponding to the flexible integration made possible by automation. 
Despite of it had stir autonomy in her work but with no additional motivating factors and reinforces, it still causes discontentment in her part.  The salaries alone cannot suffice the hard work being exerted; therefore, there is always a need for additional reinforces to make job enrichment more reinforcing to the workforce. 
In classical operant conditioning, the general assumption holds that behavior would likely to increasingly occur again provided that organism are provided with reinforces that are reinforcing. 
Similarly, vague discontent and manifest, visible expressions of conformity do not exclude one another as being remarked by Stuurman (1985).

Fourth issue
To be tackled is the development of bad perception of what job enrichment can adversely bring. 
Given all the undesirable experiences Stone felt from the job enrichment and the lack of understanding of the essence of what job enrichment is supposed to be, contributed to the development of bad perception and the change in general.  Hyman (1984) notes, management’s role as servants of accumulation means that there is a constant drive to reduce labor costs, to intensify the pressure of work, to render existing workers ‘redundant’. 
The flaws of job enrichment planning causes not only misconception but had lead to the perception that job enrichment is not enriching but had been perceived to be deceptive on Stone’s part.

   “Assessing HR effectiveness places the emphasis on money not people”
 Human resource effectiveness cannot be measured alone on the management of human resources but also on the money being invested can be accounted on the success of human resource department as being able to successfully implement the necessary changes that leads to empowerment of the whole organization.  It has often been a misconception to many that human resources only have limited functions and are perhaps considered to be not as valuable as the other departments of an organization.  From the traditional function of human resource in the staffing, recruiting, compensation, and benefits are slowly losing ground such that human resource had evolved into a new generation of value-added human resource functions that now includes career planning, executive development, training, succession planning, and organization development. In fact, according to Caudron (1994), insurance claims administration, outplacement services, employee assistance programs, 401(k) plan administration, dependent care assistance, and other no value-added functions are being outsourced by many companies to the human resource in an effort to become more competitive.
 Human resource evolution is moved to issues pertaining to the incorporation of industrial relations into HRM (Guest, 1991); then the integration of HRM into business strategies, devolvement of HRM to line managers (Brewster et al., 1997; Budhwar and Sparrow, 1997), and finally seeing HRM as a source of competitive advantage for organizations (Barney, 1991; Schuler and MacMillan, 1984; Wright et al., 1994).  Given these increasing demands to the human resource functions, it is evident that HR is already valuable and soon to be an indispensable part in any organization.  Moreover, with these developments the nature of human resource function has changed from being reactive, prescriptive, and administrative to being proactive, descriptive and executive (Boxall, 1994).
 HR effectiveness in terms of money can be reflected from the surveys on HRM that clearly conveys a field that is promising and have become increasingly responsive to changes in its broad both internal and external environment that is also being brought about by the pervasive technological innovations, new approaches being employed in the private sectors as a response to the rapid changing market trend and the like.  If HR produces ineffective results to the corporations, company, and everyone in the business sector, the business world in general, would not invest in the human resources if they find it wasteful and not of beneficial to them wherein in fact a big part of the principle of business people is to avoid unnecessary expenditure that would be too costly.  Therefore, the effectiveness of HR surmounted to the fact that there is indeed effectiveness in their function.  In a study by Eichinger and Ulrich (1995) indicates that in the next five to seven years at least 10 profound changes will alter the course of businesses and the function of HR. They identify these changes as global economic and financial, technological, political, structural (to the business organization), educational, labor-related, social, conflicts due to globalization, environmental, and crime-related.  Perhaps, of the rising researches and study being purported into the evolution of HR functions not being limited contributes to the prevalent effectiveness of HR in terms of money as being worth of every penny.
  Currently, the trends in contracting human resource functions are expected to continue.  As the human resource aligns in the emphasis of performance, improvement and enhanced discretion of management, flexibility, training, and so on, it is not surprising to predict that HRM professionals may assume the leadership partner role in the years to come.  The support of these claims may be further confirmed from the survey results lend by the Winter Commission and National Performance Review and to the recommendations of other reformers who call out for a leaner, more responsive government with particular reference to human resource management (Thompson and Radin, 1997). The observable commonalities yielded from the statement are the increasing discretion of management, rise in the flexibleness and HRM systems as being responsive, enhanced performance efficiency, adoption of techniques from the private-sector and the decentralization of activities in the HRM activities within the walls of public organizations that is characterized as being bureaucratic.
 The future role of human resource will ever be supportive in the commitment of the company to gain a competitive advantage through the “making” and developing of high competent quality people and through aiding business manager to strategically plan the functions of those people within the organization to evoke efficiency and effectiveness. The shift from functioning as administrative support to being a partner in charting business strategy the future direction of HR would likely evolve from.

Individual Performance
In current era employee performance has been into a lot of debates among the industrialist and researchers. Employee performance within an organization can be defined with a variety of ways including their behavior, attitude and motivation to achieve goals (Ali and Jadoon, 2012). Taylor was one of the initial providers who had recognized the factors that are going to influence the performance of the employee during the work and in overall development. There are 4 major factors that may affect the employee performance. These are: ¾ Job Autonomy ¾ Organizational Support ¾ Training ¾ Justice in the Organization
Job Autonomy
Job autonomy can play a vital role in enhancing the performance of the employee in the organization. Job autonomy creates a sense of responsibility among the employees (Dean, Colarelli & Konstans, 1987). Increasing impact of job autonomy on the employee performance and the absence of job autonomy in the organizations creates so many problems like decrease in productivity, performance and increase in stress. The employee performance cannot be increased merely by increasing the focus on the authority, discipline and control in the organizations (Hart &Willower, 1994).

Organizational Support and Performance
The sense of ownership in the organization that the company is giving importance their views and giving them importance is collectively called as organizational support and the existence of that also increase the employee performance (Fasolo, Eisenberger & Davis LaMastr, 1990). The employees can give extra ordinary effort to the productivity of the organization when the organization is giving them full support.
Training and Performance
The effects of training on performance in service companies. The aim of the study was to determine whether effort invested by service companies in employee training had an impact on their economic performance. Data was measured over a period of nine years. The findings supported that training activities are a positive influence on company performance Del Valle et al. (2009).
Organizational Justice and Performance
The organizational justice has been a very hot topic from a long time period till now and all level of researchers and also among the professional society. The organizational justice when achieved in its true sense, it may affect the employee performance, their commitment level in the organization and also their level of efforts towards achievement of their goals (Folger and Cropanzano, 1998).
 Job Enrichment
Is an attempt to make a job more varied by removing the dullness associated with performing repetitive operations. In job enrichment, the attempt is to build in to jobs a higher sense of challenge and achievement. The accumulation of achievement must lead to a feeling of personal growth accompanied by a sense of responsibility.

Job enrichment, as it is currently practiced in industry, is a direct outgrowth of Herzberg’s Two Factor Theory of motivation. It is, therefore, based on the assumption that in order to motivate personnel, the job itself must provide opportunities for achievement recognition, responsibility, advancement and growth. The basic idea is to restore to jobs the elements of interest that were taken away under intensive specialization.

Job enrichment tries to embellish the job with factors that Herzberg characterized as motivators: achievement, recognition, increased responsibilities, opportunities for growth, advancement and increased competence. There is an attempt to build into jobs a higher sense of challenge and achievement, through vertical job loading.

Vertical job loading entails redesigning jobs to give:
Greater responsibility,
Greater autonomy,
More immediate feedback to the individual or group. This might include transferring some of the superior’s activities to subordinates.

Principles applicable to the HDFC Bank are:
Give new and added responsibilities to employees so they are constantly challenged and empowered to control aspects of their work setting.

Provide opportunities for ongoing training that will contribute to quality of performance, personal and professional growth. Give employees special assignments and supervisor’s task to broaden each person’s understanding of the total operation of the company. This procedure can bring more recognition from other staff and can open up greater opportunities for advancement.

A job enrichment Implementing Process at HDFC Bank Company:
The cornerstone of the job enrichment process is that it is the client’s program. All activities are directed by the principle that the client owns and controls the effort. A diagram of the job enrichment process is shown in Figure as it meaningful way to understand how job enrichment might proceed at HDFC Bank Company
The first step is that a goal-setting exercise is conducted to help the client formalize what is wanted and expected from job enrichment.

The next step is to conduct one three-hour workshop with the supervisors and another workshop with about maximum working level people. The workshops provide about one hour on theory and implementing concepts. The purpose of the theory and concepts training is to prepare people to participate in a structured, one-hour brainstorming session that seeks to find out “ways in which the company might enrich the jobs.

After the brainstorming, the job enrichment managers take the ideas (perhaps as many as 400) that have been generated from the two sessions and sort them into job enrichment-related ideas and non-job enrichment-related ideas. The managers then meet with the key staff (implementing group) for 6 hours during a two-day period, to evaluate the ideas and determine which ones are worth studying for possible implementation.

At this meeting each job enrichment idea is discussed, and, if warranted, an action person and due date are assigned by the manager for reporting to the implementing group. The job enrichment manager’s role during the evaluation session is that of a facilitator to the manager, assistance in recording, , conflict resolution, and communications mayor may not be needed.

The final stage of job enrichment is evaluation. The job enrichment managers return to the unit about six months later, administer a post-test questionnaire, and provide feedback to the manager about changes in attitudes. A final report is then prepared by the client. This report provides the client’s evaluation of the job enrichment effort and the measurable outcome of the project.

There is a good deal of hard work involved. Extensive time commitments are needed to evaluate job enrichment ideas and develop implementing plans. It takes a really committed manager to do job enrichment in the midst of the day-to-day organizational crises that seem to abound.

A Job Enrichment Implementing Process:
The cornerstone of the job enrichment process is that it is the client’s program. All activities are directed by the principle that the client owns and controls the effort. The job enrichment manager is an expert in the process of gathering data, conducting workshops,
Problem–solving techniques, goal setting, etc.; however, the job enrichment manager is not an expert in the client’s job or organization
Hertzberg suggested the following10 steps for job enrichment which will help the job become more satisfying to the individual:
Select appropriate jobs for the job enrichment Programme. Hertzberg suggested three criteria for this purpose:-
the jobs should have possibilities of improvement, i.e., there is evidence of people involvement and motivation,
improvement of the hygiene factors is becoming costly,
Other changes tried out have not made much difference in the level of motivation.

Start the Programmer of job enrichment with the belief that changes made in the jobs will produce good results.

Brainstorm a list of changes that can be made in the job for its enrichment.

Review the list and eliminate suggestions which involve hygiene’s.

Review the again and remove suggestions which do not give any specific ideas about how general things can be made specific.

Review the list again and remove suggestions which are concerned only with additional work and which do not fall in the category of motivators.

Avoid direct participation by the job holders. Any ideas they may have can be given to others and may be reviewed in advance, but they may not participate in the final Programme of job enrichment.

Experiment can be compared with those of other groups, which are used as control groups to see how much difference is made by the job enrichment programme.

Be prepared for initial setback in terms of lower production and some difficulties. Any change may cause some problems in the beginning and may result in low productivity in the initial period.

Also, be prepared for an initial negative reaction of the supervisory staff, including some anxiety and hostility towards the experiment.

In 1975, Hack man and Oldham proposed another popular model of job enrichment that they call the “Job Characteristics Model”. In this model, the degree to which jobs are motivating can be assessed through five core job characteristics: skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy, and job feedback, all of which are characteristics that Hertzberg might have termed “motivators”. Skill variety is defined as the degree to which a job requires a variety of different skills to be completed. Task identity is the degree to which the job requires completion of a number of whole, identifiable pieces of work. Task significance is the extent to which a job has a meaningful impact on other jobs in the same workplace. Autonomy is the limit to which a job provides substantial freedom, independence and discretion, and job feedback is the degree to which carrying out work activities produces direct and clear information about the performance of an individual.
Hack man and Oldham’s research led to the conclusion that “to the extent that a job contains these five characteristics, three psychological states are produced: experienced meaningfulness of the work, experienced responsibility for outcomes of the work, and knowledge of the actual results of the work activities. To the degree that these psychological states are present, high internal work motivation exists.
The above five factors of job design that typically contribute to people’s enjoyment of a job are:
Skill Variety – Increasing the number of skills that individuals use while performing work.

Task Identity – Enabling people to perform a job from start to finish.

Task Significance – Providing work that has a direct impact on the organization.

Autonomy – Increasing the degree of decision making, and the freedom.

The job enrichment study for employees at HDFC Bank includes:
Employees can demonstrate their initiative, willingness and ability to learn new skills.

Gain job experience; can meet minimum qualification of job for career advancement.

Make a commitment to employee career by investing time and energy in learning new skills. It demonstrates that they are self-motivated.

Thus it has been discussed by Ralph Brown that “job enrichment doesn’t work for everyone. Some people are very resistant to more responsibility or to opportunities for personal growth, but researchers report that some people expected to resist, seizes the opportunity”.
After the study for employees have been made, the employee’s perceptions on job enrichment at the company are taken: and it is summarized as ‘Benefits’ in the following three words:
Renewal includes a number of responses related to career plateauing: “routine and boredom, need to change, thinking about new career options or priorities, making new contacts and seeing the program from a different vantagepoint.”
Exploration includes such terms as “trying new skills, looking at new concepts, developing new relationships and networks, and testing management and administrative skills.

“Specialization” refers to working in one specific subject matter area rather than as a generalist and includes such responses as “re-education, in-depth exploration, using special skills, meeting a need that was under-served, and renewing old skills.

STRATEGIES:
Here are some strategies you can use to enrich jobs in your workplace:
Rotate Jobs – Give people the opportunity to use a variety of skills, and perform different kinds of work. The most common way to do this is through job rotation. Move your workers through a variety of jobs that allow them to see different parts of the organization learn different skills and acquire different experiences. This can be very motivating, especially for people in jobs that are very repetitive or that focus on only one or two skills.

Combine Tasks – Combine work activities to provide a more challenging and complex work assignment. This can significantly increase “task identity” because people see a job through from start to finish. This allows workers to use a wide variety of skills, which can make the work seem more meaningful and important. For example, you can convert an assembly line process, in which each person does one task, into a process in which one person assembles a whole unit. You can apply this model wherever you have people or groups that typically perform only one part of an overall process. Consider expanding their roles to give them responsibility for the entire process, or for a bigger part of that process.

Identify Project-Focused Work Units – Break your typical functional lines and form project-focused units. For example, rather than having all of your marketing people in one department, with supervisors directing who works on which project, you could split the department into specialized project units – specific storyboard creators, copywriters, and designers could all work together for one client or one campaign. Allowing employees to build client relationships is an excellent way to increase autonomy, task identity, and feedback.

Create Autonomous Work Teams – This is job enrichment at the group level. Set a goal for a team, and make team members free to determine work assignments, schedules, rest breaks, evaluation parameters, and the like. You may even give them influence over choosing their own team members. With this method, you’ll significantly cut back on supervisory positions, and people will gain leadership and management skills.

Implement Participative Management – Allow team members to participate in decision making and get involved in strategic planning. This is an excellent way to communicate to members of your team that their input is important. It can work in any organization – from a very small company, with an owner/boss who’s used to dictating everything, to a large company with a huge hierarchy. When people realize that what they say is valued and makes a difference, they’ll likely be motivated.

Redistribute Power and Authority – Redistribute control and grant more authority to workers for making job-related decisions. As supervisors delegate more authority and responsibility, team members’ autonomy, accountability, and task identity will increase.

Increase Employee-Directed Feedback – Make sure that people know how well, or poorly, they’re performing their jobs. The more control you can give them for evaluating and monitoring their own performance, the more enriched their jobs will be. Rather than have your quality control department go around and point out mistakes, consider giving each team responsibility for their own quality control. Workers will receive immediate feedback, and they’ll learn to solve problems, take initiative, and make decisions.

Job enrichment provides many opportunities for people’s development. You’ll give them lots of opportunity for their task to participate in how their work gets done, and they’ll most-likely enjoy an increased sense of personal responsibility. Job enrichment is connected to the concept of job enlargement.

Job enrichment is the process of “improving work processes and environments so they are more satisfying for employees”.

Many jobs are monotonous and unrewarding – particularly in the primary and secondary production industries. Workers can feel dissatisfied in their position due to a lack of a challenge, repetitive procedures, or an over-controlled authority structure.

Job enrichment tries to eliminate these problems, and bring better performance to the workplace.

There are three key parts to the process of job enrichment
1. Turn employees’ effort into performance:
Ensuring that objectives are well-defined and understood by everyone. The overall corporate mission statement should be communicated to all. Individual’s goals should also be clear. Each employee should know exactly how she fits into the overall process and be aware of how important her contributions are to the organization and its customers.

Providing adequate resources for each employee to perform well. This includes support functions like information technology, communication technology, and personnel training and development.

Creating a supportive corporate culture. This includes peer support networks, supportive management, and removing elements that foster mistrust and politicking.

Free flow of information. Eliminate secrecy.

Provide enough freedom to facilitate job excellence. Encourage and reward employee initiative. Flextime or compressed hours could be offered.

Provide adequate recognition, appreciation, and other motivators.

Provide skill improvement opportunities. This could include paid education at universities or on the job training.

Provide job variety. This can be done by job sharing or job rotation programmes.

It may be necessary to re-engineer the job process. This could involve redesigning the physical facility, redesign processes, change technologies, simplification of procedures, elimination of repetitiveness, redesigning authority structures.

2. Link employee’s performance directly to reward:
Clear definition of the reward is a must
Explanation of the link between performance and reward is important
Make sure the employee gets the right reward if performs well
If reward is not given, explanation is needed
3. Make sure the employee wants the reward. How to find out?
Ask them
Use surveys( checklist, listing, questionnaire)
Job enrichment is a type of job redesign intended to reverse the effects of tasks that are repetitive requiring little autonomy. Some of these effects are boredom, lack of flexibility, and employee dissatisfaction (Leach ; Wall, 2004). The underlying principle is to expand the scope of the job with a greater variety of tasks, vertical in nature, that require self-sufficiency. Since the goal is to give the individual exposure to tasks normally reserved for differently focused or higher positions, merely adding more of the same responsibilities related to an employee’s current position are not considered job enrichment.

The basis for job enrichment practices is the work done by Frederick Herzberg in the 1950’s and 60’s, which was further refined in 1975 by Hackman and Oldham using what they called the Job Characteristics Model. This model assumes that if five core job characteristics are present, three psychological states critical to motivation are produced, resulting in positive outcomes (Kotila, 2001). Figure 1 illustrates this model.

SOFT SKILLS OF EMPLOYEES
Soft skills are very vital for any employee in a firm. It should be his endeavor to ensure for the learning and practicing of the soft skills in every walk of life. It is one of the key factors to gain weight -age before the higher officials in his company or firm who will always appreciate the existence of the skills within you. Once a standardized opinion is formed against any employee based on the acquisition & development of soft skills, it ensures sustainability for ever to generate progress of the employee in the organization for its promotion.

Employers always try to find its employees with full pledged experts in all aspects with sufficient skills for improvement of the working conditions. Employees and workers must take this opportunity to develop their multiple skills for the promotion of the objectives and goals of the firm. Their ambition and inculcation should turn towards the enrichment of soft skills at every point of time, with proper initiation and interest, so that it would not be a difficult task for its complete attainment.

PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS OF EMPLOYEES
The skill of problem solving is also one of important component of interpersonal skills. In our day to day work, we have to face many challenges, problems, difficulties which are to be tackled very cleverly and conveniently.  Problem solving is a technical skill for any body to tackle it.  You can attain this technique with the help of your colleagues, friends, and official companions with due interaction and discussion of the issues in details to resolve. Keen observation of your official transactions, dealings, accomplishments, you can develop your knowledge and skill for resolving the problems. It is a great opportunity for you to interact with your co-employees in all aspects with positive mind and constructive attitude, which will deliver a sense of responsibility on the disposal of all the problems with positive outlook and skillful observation on the problematic issues. It is one’s own responsibility to improve this skill in his career. By virtue of our experience in the Institution, the various methods of problem solving will be known, and the tactics and solutions to the problems may improve further for possible resolutions. Tackling the problems within the organizations or institution will further make us expertise to resolve the things at the appropriate level.

Every employee may discharge his duties properly in sound environment and un-critical conditions. But it is very difficult for any one to discharge his legitimate duties when the Institution/organization/firm is in a critical condition. The capability of the employee will be revealed only when he discharged his job duties satisfactory during the period under which the Management is in critical condition. Intellectual power, mental stamina, and micro level examination of the issues, are more important when you face such kind of situation. These qualities we have to develop a lot to tackle the un-warranted situations, and critical environmental positions in the interest of our organization/firm. To tackle such kind of critical conditions, managerial skills and spontaneous attitude should be developed for the welfare of the organization as well as its employees. That kind of skill is very much necessary for every body to withstand further. It is important for his/her prospects.

This, we can attain by virtue of our experience, practice, and continuity of our standards of work, and collectivity and congregation of managerial ideas, concepts and techniques. . Self confidence is the primary objective to attain this skill.  Updating of your knowledge day by day and continuous efforts to extract and do the work, thrust towards working knowledge and power, will certainly enrich your skills in this direction in an undoubted manner. Workability and capability are the strengths to withstand during the course of critical environment in the organizations, and to face the challenges with dare and dashing. Managerial techniques and skills develop during our repeated tasks of duties in our daily life and make us feel happy to face such challenges.

Inviting situational changes is also one of the soft skills. The readinesses to face the changes, the capacity to tackle the challenges on account of transformable changes in the line of activity, are the need of the hour. It is our Endeavour to act according to the tunes of the attitudinal changes of the personnel, simultaneous developments in the work arena, in the interest of the organization as well as the welfare of the employees. It may not be considered to be as a negative approach, but to treat it as a component for better understanding of the situational changes from time to time.

OTHER INCENTIVES
Study after study has found that the most effective motivators of workers are non monetary. Monetary systems are insufficient, in part because expectations often exceed results and because disparity between salaried individuals may divide rather than unite employees. Proven non monetary motivators foster team spirit and include recognition, responsibility, and advancement. Managers, who recognize the “small wins” of employees, promote participatory environments, and treat employees with fairness and respect will find their employees to be more highly motivated. One company’s managers brainstormed to come up with 30 powerful rewards that cost little or nothing to implement. The most effective rewards, such as letters of commendation and time off from work, enhanced personal fulfillment and self-respect. Over the longer term, sincere praise and personal gestures are far more effective and more economical than awards of money alone. In the end, a program that combines monetary reward systems and satisfies intrinsic, self-actualizing needs may be the most potent employee motivator.

COMPANY PROFILE
HDFC Bank Limited
The Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited (HDFC) was amongst the first to receive an ‘in principle’ approval from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) to set up a bank in the private sector, as part of the RBI’s liberalization of the Indian Banking Industry in 1994. The bank was incorporated in August 1994 in the name of ‘HDFC Bank Limited’, with its registered office in Mumbai, India. HDFC Bank commenced operations as a Scheduled Commercial Bank in January 1995.

Promoter
HDFC is India’s premier housing finance company and enjoys an impeccable track record in India as well as in international markets. Since its inception in 1977, the Corporation has maintained a consistent and healthy growth in its operations to remain the market leader in mortgages. Its outstanding loan portfolio covers well over a million dwelling units. HDFC has developed significant expertise in retail mortgage loans to different market segments and also has a large corporate client base for its housing related credit facilities. With its experience in the financial markets, a strong market reputation, large shareholder base and unique consumer franchise, HDFC was ideally positioned to promote a bank in the Indian environment.
Business focus
HDFC Bank’s mission is to be a World-Class Indian Bank. The objective is to build sound customer franchises across distinct businesses so as to be the preferred provider of banking services for target retail and wholesale customer segments, and to achieve healthy growth in profitability, consistent with the bank’s risk appetite. The bank is committed to maintain the highest level of ethical standards, professional integrity, and corporate governance and regulatory. Compliance. HDFC Bank’s business philosophy is based on four core values – Operational Excellence, Customer Focus, Product Leadership and People
Capital Structure
The authorized capital of HDFC Bank is Rs.450 crore (Rs.4.5 billion). The paid-up capital is Rs.309.9 crore (Rs.3.09 billion). The HDFC Group holds 22.2% of the bank’s equity and about 19.5% of the equity is held by the ADS Depository (in respect of the bank’s American Depository Shares (ADS) Issue). Roughly 31.7% of the equity is held by Foreign Institutional Investors (FIIs) and the bank has about 190,000 shareholders. The shares are listed on the Stock Exchange, Mumbai and the National Stock Exchange. The bank’s American Depository Shares are listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the symbol “HDB”.
Times Bank Amalgamation
In a milestone transaction in the Indian banking industry, Times Bank Limited (another new private sector bank promoted by Bennett, Coleman & Co. /Times Group) was merged with HDFC Bank Ltd., effective February 26, 2000. As per the scheme of amalgamation approved by the shareholders of both banks and the Reserve Bank of India, shareholders of Times Bank received 1 share of HDFC Bank for every 5.75 shares of Times Bank. The acquisition added significant value to HDFC Bank in terms of increased branch network, expanded geographic reach, enhanced customer base, skilled manpower and the opportunity to cross-sell and leverage alternative delivery channels.
Distribution Network
HDFC Bank is headquartered in Mumbai. The Bank at present has an enviable network of over 495 branches spread over 218 cities across India. All branches are linked on an online real-time basis. Customers in over 120 locations are also serviced through Telephone Banking. The Bank’s expansion plans take into account the need to have a presence in all major industrial and commercial centers where its corporate customers are located as well as the need to build a strong retail customer base for both deposits and loan products. Being a clearing/settlement bank to various leading stock exchanges, the Bank has branches in the centers where the NSE/BSE has a strong and active member base.

The Bank also has a network of about over 1054-networked ATMs across these cities. Moreover, HDFC Bank’s ATM network can be accessed by all domestic and international Visa/MasterCard, Visa Electron/Maestro, Plus/Cirrus and American Express Credit/Charge cardholders.
Management
Mr. JagdishCapoor took over as the bank’s Chairman in July 2001. Prior to this,
Mr. Capoor was a Deputy Governor of the Reserve Bank of India.

The Managing Director, Mr. AdityaPuri, has been a professional banker for over 25 years and before joining HDFC Bank in 1994 was heading Citibank’s operations in Malaysia.

The Bank’s Board of Directors is composed of eminent individuals with a wealth of experience in public policy, administration, industry and commercial banking. Senior executives representing HDFC are also on the Board.

Senior banking professionals with substantial experience in India and abroad head various businesses and functions and report to the Managing Director. Given the professional expertise of the management team and the overall focus on recruiting and retaining the best talent in the industry, the bank believes that its people are a significant competitive strength.
Technology
HDFC Bank operates in a highly automated environment in terms of information technology and communication systems. All the bank’s branches have online connectivity, which enables the bank to offer speedy funds transfer facilities to its customers. Multi-branch access is also provided to retail customers through the branch network and Automated Teller Machines (ATMs).

The Bank has made substantial efforts and investments in acquiring the best technology available internationally, to build the infrastructure for a world class bank. In terms of software, the Corporate Banking business is supported by Flexcube, while the Retail Banking business by Finware, both from i-flex Solutions Ltd. The systems are open, scalable and web-enabled.
The Bank has prioritized its engagement in technology and the Internet as one of its key goals and has already made significant progress in web-enabling its core businesses. In each of its businesses, the Bank has succeeded in leveraging its market position, expertise and technology to create a competitive advantage and build market share.
Business Profile
HDFC Bank caters to a wide range of banking services covering commercial and investment banking on the wholesale side and transactional / branch banking on the retail side. The bank has three key business segments:
a)Wholesale Banking Services
The Bank’s target market is primarily large, blue chip manufacturing companies in the Indian corporate sector and to a lesser extent, small ; mid-sized corporate and agro-based businesses. For these customers, the Bank provides a wide range of commercial and transactional banking services, including working capital finance, trade services, transactional services, cash management, etc. The bank is also a leading provider of structured solutions, which combine cash management services with vendor and distributor finance for facilitating superior supply chain management for its corporate customers. Based on its superior product delivery / service levels and strong customer orientation, the Bank has made significant inroads into the banking consortia of a number of leading Indian corporate including multinationals, companies from the domestic business houses and prime public sector companies. It is recognized as a leading provider of cash management and transactional banking solutions to corporate customers, mutual funds, stock exchange members and banks.
b)Retail Banking Services
The objective of the Retail Bank is to provide its target market customers a full range of financial products and banking services, giving the customer a one-stop window for all his/her banking requirements. The products are backed by world-class service and delivered to the customers through the growing branch network, as well as through alternative delivery channels like ATMs, Phone Banking, Net Banking and Mobile Banking.

The HDFC Bank Preferred program for high net worth individuals, the HDFC Bank Plus and the Investment Advisory Services programs have been designed keeping in mind needs of customers who seek distinct financial solutions, information and advice on various investment avenues. The Bank also has a wide array of retail loan products including Auto Loans, Loans against marketable securities, Personal Loans and Loans for Two-wheelers.
HDFC Bank was the first bank in India to launch an International Debit Card in association with VISA (VISA Electron) and issues the MasterCard Maestro debit card as well. The Bank launched its credit card business in late 2001. By March 2005, the bank had a total card base (debit and credit cards) of 4.2 million cards. The Bank is also one of the leading players in the “merchant acquiring” business with over 42,000 Point-of-sale (POS) terminals for debit / credit cards acceptance at merchant establishments. The Bank is well positioned as a leader in various net based B2C opportunities including a wide range of internet banking services for Fixed Deposits, Loans, Bill Payments, etc.
c)Treasury
Within this business, the bank has three main product areas – Foreign Exchange and Derivatives, Local Currency Money Market ; Debt Securities, and Equities. With the liberalization of the financial markets in India, corporate need more sophisticated risk management information, advice and product structures. These and fine pricing on various treasury products are provided through the bank’s Treasury team. To comply with statutory reserve requirements, the bank is required to hold 25% of its deposits in government securities. The Treasury business is responsible for managing the returns and market risk on this investment portfolio.
RATINGS/AWARDS
Credit Rating
HDFC Bank has its deposit programmes rated by two rating agencies – Credit Analysis & Research Limited. (CARE) and Fitch Ratings India Private Limited. The Bank’s Fixed Deposit programmed has been rated ‘CARE AAA (FD)’ Triple A by CARE, which represents instruments considered to be “of the best quality, carryingnegligible investment risk”. CARE has also rated the Bank’s Certificate of Deposit (CD) programmed “PR 1+” which represents “superior capacity for repayment of short term promissory obligations”. Fitch Ratings India Pvt. Ltd. (100% subsidiary of Fitch Inc.) has assigned the “AAA (ind)” rating to the Bank’s deposit programmed, with the outlook on the rating as “stable”. This rating indicates “highest credit quality” where “protection factors are very high”. HDFC Bank also has its long term unsecured, subordinated (Tier II) Bonds of Rs.4 billion rated by CARE and Fitch Ratings India Private Limited.
CARE has assigned the rating of “CARE AAA” for the Tier II Bonds while Fitch Ratings India Pvt. Ltd. has assigned the rating “AAA (Ind)” with the outlook on the rating as “stable”. In each of the cases referred to above, the ratings awarded were the highest assigned by the rating agency for those instruments?
Corporate Governance Rating
The bank was one of the first four companies, which subjected itself to a Corporate Governance and Value Creation (GVC) rating by the rating agency, The Credit Rating Information Services of India Limited (CRISIL). The rating provides an independent assessment of an entity’s current performance and an expectation on its “balanced value creation and corporate governance practices” in future. The bank has been assigned a ‘CRISIL GVC Level 1’ rating which indicates that the bank’s capability with respect to wealth creation for all its stakeholders while adopting sound corporate governance practices is the highest.
Awards and Accolades
Over the years, HDFC Bank has received recognition and awards from various leading organizations and publications, both domestic and international
Awards and achievements-Bank services
In June 2005, HDFC Bank won Asia money magazine’s “Best Domestic
Commercial Bank Award 2005” for India.

The Bank was awarded The Asian Banker’s, “Excellence in Retail Banking Risk Management Award for 2004”, and pan-Asia recognition of the bank’s risk management abilities.
The Asset (Triple a Country Awards) rated HDFC Bank as the “Best Domestic Bank in India – 2004” and “Best Domestic Bank in India – 2003”.

Forbes Global again named the Bank in its listing of ‘Best under a Billion, 100 Best Smaller Size Enterprises in Asia/Pacific and Europe”, in its November 2004 issue.

The Bank was rated as the “Best Overall Local/Domestic Bank – India” in the Corporate Cash Management Poll conducted by the Hong Kong based Asia money magazine.

The said magazine also awarded the Bank with the titles of “Overall Most Improved Company for Best Management Practices in India” in the Best Managed Companies poll 2004, “Best Local Cash Management Bank”, Best Overall Domestic Trade Finance Services Award”, and also awarded the Managing Director, Mr. AdityaPuri as the “Best Chief Executive Officer in India”. In May 2004, the Bank also won the “Operational
Excellence in Retail Financial Services – India” award as part of the Asian Banker Excellence in Retail Financial Services Program 2003.

HDFC Bank was selected by Finance Asia as the “Best Local Bank – India 2003”, “Best Local Bank in India 2002”, “Best Domestic Commercial Bank – India 2001”, “Best Domestic Commercial Bank – India 2000” and “Best Domestic Commercial Bank – India 1999”.

Euro money rated HDFC Bank as “Best Bank in India 2002”, “Best Bank – India 2001”, “Best Domestic Bank – India 2000” and “Best Bank – India 1999”.

For its use of information technology the bank has been recognized as a “Computer world Honors Laureate” and awarded the 21st Century Achievement Award in 2002 for Finance, Insurance ; Real Estate category by Computer world, Inc., USA.

Closer home, HDFC Bank was selected as the “Best Bank in India” for the second consecutive year in 2004 by Business Today. The Bank was selected by Business World as “one of India’s Most Respected Companies” as part of The Business World Most Respected Company Awards 2004.
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
1)  ‘An organization provides good working conditions’
S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 18 36
2 Agree 29 58
3 Disagree 2 4
4 Strongly disagree 1 2
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph.

Interpretation: When asked in the survey about the provision of good working conditions in an organization, 36% of the respondents say they strongly agree. A majority of 58% of them say they agree. 4% of them say they disagree and while last 2% of them strongly Disagrees.
(2) ‘There exists a proper orientation for doing a given job more effectively’ 
S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 17 34
2 Agree 24 48
3 Disagree 9 18
4 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph:

Interpretation:
In the survey conducted, it was analyzed that 34% of respondents strongly agree that a proper orientation is been given for doing a given job more effectively. Whereas 48% of the employees say that they agree. 18%say they disagree and 5% say they strongly disagree.

3) ‘You are introduced with variety of tasks’ 
S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 15 30
2 Agree 25 50
3 Disagree 8 16
4 Strongly disagree 2 4
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph.

Interpretation:
In the survey conducted, it was analyzed that 30% of the employees strongly agree that they are introduced with variety of tasks. While a majority of 50% of the employees agree. 16% of them disagree and 4% of them strongly disagree.

4) ‘To maintain regular positions an adequate infrastructure facilities are provided’
S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 10 20
2 Agree 25 50
3 Disagree 14 28
4 Strongly disagree 1 2
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph.

Interpretation: In the survey conducted, when asked about the adequate infrastructure facilities that are given to maintain regular positions, 20% of the employees strongly agree to it. A majority of 50% agree to it. While 28% disagree. Only 2% strongly disagree.

(5) ‘There exists a degree of motivation as far as job is concerned’ 
S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 17 34
2 Agree 24 48
3 Disagree 7 14
4 Strongly disagree 2 4
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph.

Interpretation:
When asked in the survey about an existence of degree of motivation in a job, 34% of the employees strongly agree to it. 48% of the employees agree. While 14% of them disagree and there is 4% who strongly disagree.

(6) ‘Direct and clear information about job outcomes is provided’ 

S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Frequently 13 26
2 Rarely 20 40
3 Always 11 22
4 Never 6 12
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph.

Interpretation:
In survey conducted, 26% of employees preferred that clear information about job outcomes is provided frequently. While a majority of them think that rarely the information is provided. 22% of them think always the information is provided. Another 12% feel that never it is provided.

(7) ‘On the basis of feedback given about the job, your performance can be assessed and corrected’ 
S.NO Accepted level No. Of .respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 22 44
2 Agree 27 54
3 Disagree 1 2
4 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph.

Interpretation:
In the survey conducted, it can be inferred that 44% of the employees strongly agree that on the basis of feedback given about the job they can assess and correct the performance. Whereas 54% say they agree. Remaining 2% of them disagree and 0% strongly disagrees.8) ‘An amount of recognition and appreciation is given for the work done’ 
S.NO Accepted level No. of Respondents % of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 12 24
2 Agree 25 50
3 Disagree 11 22
4 Strongly disagree 2 4
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph.

Interpretation:
In the survey conducted, it clear that 24% of the employees say that they strongly agree to the point that an amount of recognition and appreciation is given for the work done. A majority of 50% of employees agree to it. While 22% of them disagree and 4% of them strongly disagree.

9) ‘There exists an acceptance of a change in your regular job’
S.NO Accepted level No. of Respondents % of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 8 16
2 Agree 38 76
3 Disagree 3 6
4 Strongly disagree 1 2
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph

Interpretation:
In the survey conducted, it is clear that 16% of the employees say that they strongly agree to the point that there is an acceptance of a change in your regular job. A majority of 76% agree. But 6% say they disagree and remaining 2% strongly disagree to it.
(10) ‘There exists a development in your competency level’
S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 16 32
2 Agree 30 60
3 Disagree 4 8
4 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph

Interpretation:
In survey conducted, what we can interpret is that 32% of the employees strongly agree to the point that there is a development in their competency level. Another 60% of them agree to it. Remaining 8% of the employees disagrees. 0% of the employees strongly disagree.

(11) ‘There is effectiveness in the manner of tasks that you are required to perform’
S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 10 20
2 Agree 37 74
3 Disagree 3 6
4 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph

Interpretation:
When asked in survey about the effectiveness in the manner of task which they are required, 20% of the employees strongly agree. 74% of them agree to it. Remaining 6% of them disagree and 0% strongly disagrees.
(12) ‘An delegated authority and responsibility is been provided’ 
S.NO Accepted level No. Of. Respondents % Of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 11 22
2 Agree 35 70
3 Disagree 4 8
4 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph

Interpretation:
When asked in the survey about a delegated authority and responsibility that is been provided, 22% of the employees strongly agree to it. 70% of them agree to it. Remaining 8% disagrees and 0% strongly disagrees.

13) ‘There exists accountability in your work’
S.NO Accepted level No. of Respondents % of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 15 30
2 Agree 31 62
3 Disagree 4 8
4 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph

Interpretation:
In the survey conducted, it is clear that 30% of the employees strongly agree there exists accountability in your work. A majority of 62% of the employees say they agree. Remaining 8% say they disagree and 0% say strongly disagree.

14) ‘The Job Enrichment experience is been pursued as a career development’
S.NO Accepted level No. of Respondents % of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 24 48
2 Agree 21 42
3 Disagree 5 10
4 Strongly disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph

Interpretation: when asked in the survey about whether a Job Enrichment experience is been pursued as a career development, a majority of 48% of the employees strongly agree to it. Another 42% agree to it. Remaining 10%
15) ‘The Job enrichment experience has an impact on my attitude when return to regular job’
S.NO Accepted level No. of Respondents % of Respondents
1 Strongly agree 13 26
2 Agree 29 58
3 Disagree 7 14
4 Strongly disagree 1 2
Total 50 100
Above table is represented in the form of a graph

Interpretation: In the survey conducted, it is clear that 26% of the employees strongly agree that a Job enrichment experience have an impact on their attitude when returned to regular job. A majority of 58% say they agree. Another 14%say they disagree and 2% say they strongly disagree.
FINDINGS
48% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 0% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
50% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 4% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
50% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 2% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
48% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 2% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
48% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 4% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
48% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 0% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
54% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 0% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
50% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 4% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
79% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 2% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
60% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 0% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
74% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 0% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
70% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 0% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
62% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 0% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
48% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 0% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
58% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization 2% of the respondents agree with the good working condition provided in the organization
SUGGESTIONS
Organization has to improve the facilities to provide good working conditions to its employees
Orientation by the manger has to be given to his employees to ensure better work.

Job Distribution has to be more rationale so the right job can be assigned to the right person to get the right output which has to be developed to gain better knowledge of the work.

A proper infrastructure facility is an important motivational factor that has greater influence on employees.
Though the achievement of the employees are recognized, more emphasis has to be made that each and every development of employees should be recognized and properly awarded with respective title or in terms of incentive for salary or promoting to get better results.
To conclude, the job enrichment program creates a high level of competency among employees by motivating them to perform the given task effectively and it can have an impact on the employee’s attitude, when returned to regular job.

CONCLUSION
There should be a change in work to each and every person working in the organization. No employee is to be kept at the same task or work for a long period of time where he gets bored of it. The regular change in the job will provide a motivation to the employees. There shall be addition and deletion in form of work leading to job enrichment which motivates employees. To make job enrichment more effective at the company, the delegation should be there within the limitations of the profile of the employees.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Brookins, M. (n.d.). The Advantages & Disadvantages of Job Enrichment.
Feder, B.J. 2000, “F.I. Herzberg, 76, Professor and Management Consultant”, New York Times, Feb 1, 2000, pg. C26. Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851–2003). 28 October 2006.

Hackman, J.R. & Oldham, G.R. 1976, ‘Motivation through the design of work: Test of a Theory”, Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, Online, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 250–279. Available from: Science Direct. 1 November 2006.

Job Enrichment. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.whatishumanresource.com/job-enrichmentMione, P. 2006, “Job Enrichment”, online paper. Effects : boredom, lack of flexibility, employee dissatisfaction
Wall TD, Wood SJ, Leach DJ. (2004). Empowerment and performance. In Cooper CL, Robertson IT (Eds.), International review of industrial and organizational psychology, Volume 19. London: Wiley.

From http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/job-enrichment.htmwww.hdfcbank.co.inhttp://www.whatishumanresource.com/job-enrichmenthttps://w3layouts.com/human-resource-management-bootstrap-responsivehttps://www.astemplates.com/free-website-template/600-hr-theme-onehttps://www.template.net/business/hr-templates/hr-tools-and-software/
QUESTIONNAIRE
1. Do you agree that the organization provides good working conditions?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
2. Do you agree that a proper orientation is been given for doing a given job more effectively?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
3. Do you agree that you are introduced with variety of tasks?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
4. Do you agree that an adequate infrastructure facilities are given maintain regular positions?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
5. ‘There exists a degree of motivation as far as job is concerned’
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
6. ‘Direct and clear information about job outcomes is provided’
a. Frequently b. Rarely c. Always d. Never
7. Do you agree that on the basis of feedback given about the job you can assess and correct the performance?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
8. ‘An amount of recognition and appreciation is given for the work done’
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
9. Do you agree that there is an acceptance of a change in your regular job?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
10. Do you agree that there is a development in your competency level? 
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
11. Do you agree that there is effectiveness in the manner of task which you are required to perform?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
12. ‘An delegated authority and responsibility is been provided’ 
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
13. Do you agree that there exists accountability in your work?  
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
14. Do you agree that a Job Enrichment experience is been pursued as a career development?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree
15. Do you agree that a Job enrichment experience have an impact on your attitude when you return to regular job?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree.

16. Do you agree that Job enrichment improves quality of your work life?
a. Strongly agree b. Agree c. Disagree d. strongly disagree.

17. If you are asked to perform well before job enrichment the degree of performance will be same?
a. Yes b. No
18. If yes, what percentage would you think it will be?
a. 50% b. Above 50% c. 70%