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1.

“It’s not like other feelings.
At once both older and younger.
It gives birth itself to the reasons
that give it life.
When it sleeps, it’s never eternal rest.
And sleeplessness won’t sap its strength; it feeds it.”

The stanza 6-11 is conveying the idea that hatred is a dependent feeling that everyone feels at some point in their life. And there will always be hatred in the world, sometimes  without even warranting a reason. It also states that we can be easier to be more prickly and hate something with lack of sleep.

2.

“Oh these other feelings,
listless weaklings.
Since when does brotherhood
draw crowds?
Has compassion
ever finished first?
Does doubt ever really rouse the rabble?
Only hatred has just what it takes.”

The stanza 21-28 in is comparing hatred with other feelings, saying that it is much simpler to feel hatred for things than feel brotherhood, compassion, and doubt. It is saying that people are more likely to come together in groups to show hate for someone or something, and not as likely to do the same for love.

3.

“Let’s face it:
it knows how to make beauty.
The splendid fire-glow in midnight skies.
Magnificent bursting bombs in rosy dawns.
You can’t deny the inspiring pathos of ruins
and a certain bawdy humor to be found
in the sturdy column jutting from their midst.”

The stanza 24-40 is conveying the idea that hatred is destructive, hurts feelings, and is crummy; and people need to accept that. It makes it sound less negative by using words that would be associated with a more positive feeling positive to create a sort of mocking tone. The irony is that it is praising hatreds strengths and beauty by using only images of destruction and chaos. And it puts the reader in an awkward position were we cant deny that we kind of let i happen, almost if there was a strange seductive force behind it.